Abstract

Chui et al. (2010) argue that cultures with high levels of individualism are defined by overconfidence and self-attribution bias. Markus and Kitayama (1991) and Heine et al. (1999) note that these biases lead to less efficient stock prices with excess volatility. Foucault and Frésard (2012) show that sensitivity of investment to stock prices is an increasing function of informativeness of stock prices. They argue that sensitivity of investment to stock prices increase because value-maximizing managers are forced to use all available information to forecast the cash flows of their capital allocation decisions. They argue that information revealed via informative stock prices is new to value maximizing managers. Consequently, these managers incorporate this information in their analysis, thereby increasing sensitivity of investment to informative stock prices. This paper argues that individualism, being a significant determinant of information content in stock prices, can also affect sensitivity of investment to stock prices. Using data from 37 emerging markets, our results show that individualism significantly reduces sensitivity of investment to stock prices during the period between 2008 and 2014. Our results are robust to alternate estimation procedures. Our results also indicate that the effect of individualism on sensitivity of investment to stock prices is more pronounced when investment expenditures are large. Moreover, we also show that the impact of individualism on the sensitivity of investment to stock prices is moderated by the institutional, social, and cultural environment of the country.

Department

Management Department

Degree Name

MS in Finance

Date of Award

2-1-2015

Online Submission Date

July 2015

First Advisor

Farouq, Omar

Committee Member 1

Ahmed, Niveen

Committee Member 2

Bouaddi, Mohamed

Document Type

Thesis

Extent

31 p.

Rights

The author retains all rights with regard to copyright. The author certifies that written permission from the owner(s) of third-party copyrighted matter included in the thesis, dissertation, paper, or record of study has been obtained. The author further certifies that IRB approval has been obtained for this thesis, or that IRB approval is not necessary for this thesis. Insofar as this thesis, dissertation, paper, or record of study is an educational record as defined in the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 USC 1232g), the author has granted consent to disclosure of it to anyone who requests a copy.

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Approval has been obtained for this item

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