Author

Justin Hoyle

Abstract

My thesis examines the process by which the Syrian intelligentsia in Cairo catalyzed Cairo's transformation into an epicenter of the Arabist movement between 1900 and 1918. I will explore a combination of British diplomatic sources and Arabic-language publications in order to determine the role of the Syrian intelligentsia in Cairo in the burgeoning Arabist movement of the early twentieth century. In addition to contributing to our existing historical understanding of the development of Arabist ideology, this study will demonstrate the utility of analyzing centers of Arabism (in this case Cairo) that have often been neglected in contemporary nationalist historiography. Cairo provides a particularly interesting case study in terms of Arabist cooperation in the years leading up to, and including World War I. In contrast to the societies in the more frequently analyzed Arabist hotbed of Damascus, Arabist societies in Cairo were extremely ideologically diverse and contained a significant percentage of Christians. In addition, these comparatively diverse Arabist societies in Cairo were among the most significant in existence in the years following 1908. Although a homogenous version of Arabism never emerged, my thesis argues that the Syrian intelligentsia was able to develop Cairo into an epicenter of the Arabist movement in the early twentieth century that, by 1912, began to usurp Damascus for political significance.

Department

Middle East Studies Center

Degree Name

MA in Middle East Studies

Date of Award

6-1-2010

Online Submission Date

June 2010

First Advisor

Kholoussy, Hanan

Document Type

Thesis

Extent

NA

Library of Congress Subject Heading 1

Intellectuals -- Egypt -- History -- 20th century.

Library of Congress Subject Heading 2

Arabism -- Egypt -- History -- 20th century.

Rights

The author retains all rights with regard to copyright. The author certifies that written permission from the owner(s) of third-party copyrighted matter included in the thesis, dissertation, paper, or record of study has been obtained. The author further certifies that IRB approval has been obtained for this thesis, or that IRB approval is not necessary for this thesis. Insofar as this thesis, dissertation, paper, or record of study is an educational record as defined in the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 USC 1232g), the author has granted consent to disclosure of it to anyone who requests a copy.

IRB

Not necessary for this item

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