Title

Policing, Incarceration, Race, and Protest after Ferguson

Author's Department

Political Science Department

Find in your Library

http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/8613353462

All Authors

Chris Barker

Document Type

Research Article

Publication Title

Public Affairs Quarterly

Publication Date

10-1-2018

doi

https://doi.org/10.2307/26910003

Abstract

This article asks whether mass incarceration is a system and whether harsh treatment in that system is motivated by explicit and implicit racial bias. To describe this system, I adopt an alternative term, “penal regime,” which has the benefit of permitting a more inclusive and systematic account of law enforcement, courts, and corrections. My analysis is based on the important fact that US penal regimes are democratic and, to be understood in context, must be tied to American punitive and racial attitudes as expressed through the discretion of elected officeholders. I find that a racial empathy gap explains some important problems with criminal justice, and I argue that protest speech about police conduct may cross the empathy gap in a manner that deserves significant theoretical attention and practical support.

First Page

331

Last Page

350

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