Title

The psychological and social impacts of curfew during the covid-19 outbreak in kuwait: A cross-sectional study

Funding Sponsor

Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research

Find in your Library

https://doi.org/10.3390/su13158464

Document Type

Research Article

Publication Title

Sustainability (Switzerland)

Publication Date

8-1-2021

doi

10.3390/su13158464

Abstract

The Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic in Kuwait led to a nationwide curfew between 22 March and August 2020. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 curfew during the pandemic on Kuwaiti citizens and residents. A cross-sectional survey was used to collect data from Kuwaiti residents over the age of 21 through an online questionnaire shared via social media, including WhatsApp and Facebook. Data collection occurred between 18 June and 15 July 2020. Data from 679 respondents (57.9% females and 42.1% males; 67.7% Kuwaiti nationals and 32.3% non-Kuwaiti nationals) were analyzed. Symptoms of depression were reported among 59.8% of females and 51.0% of males, and extremely severe depression among 20.4% of females and 13.6% of males. Approximately 42.0% of females and 37.8% of males were under psychological distress, with 15.1% of females and 9.1% of males experiencing severe or extremely severe psychological distress. Over a third of females (34.9%) reported experiencing tensions or violent behaviors from family members, and 22.1% reported verbal or physical abuse. Among males, 26.4% reported experiencing tensions or violent behaviors, and 12.2% reported verbal or physical abuse. Extremely severe depression was associated with being female (2.00 times), aged 21–29 (4.56 times), experiencing tensions or violent behaviors from family members (4.56 times), being physically inactive (1.64 times), smoking cigarettes (3.02 times), and having poor or very poor quality of sleep (1.75 times). Severe or extremely severe psychological distress was associated with being female (3.09 times), aged 21–49 (3.68 times), having ill-health conditions or diseases (1.83 times), experiencing tension or violent behaviors from family members (3.56 times), smoking cigarettes (3.06 times), and having poor or very poor quality of sleep (2.20 times). Findings indicate that people living in Kuwait experienced negative psychological impacts, such as depression and psychological distress, attributable to the pandemic-related restrictions. Unpartnered females aged 21–49 are more mentally vulnerable than partnered males over the age of 50. Findings support an urgent need for targeted interventions to improve health behaviors and social support, including coping mechanisms specific to COVID-19 related stress, family counseling systems, and the provision of accessible and acceptable services using telehealth.

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