Title

Dietary Cinnamon Successfully Enhanced the Growth Performance, Growth Hormone, Antibacterial Capacity, and Immunity of European Sea Bass ()

Author's Department

Center for Applied Research on the Environment & Sustainability

Find in your Library

https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11072128

All Authors

Mahmoud M.Habiba; Ebtehal E. Hussein; Ahmed M. Ashry; Ahmed M. El-Zayat; Aziza M. Hassan; Ahmed M. El-Shehawi; Hani Sewilam; Hien Van Doan; Mahmoud A. Dawood

Document Type

Research Article

Publication Title

Animals: an open access journal from MDPI

Publication Date

8-8-2021

doi

10.3390/ani11072128

Abstract

Dietary cinnamon has several bioactive compounds with growth-promoting and immunomodulation potential and is suggested for finfish species. This study evaluated the inclusion of cinnamon at 0, 10, 15, and 20 g/kg in European sea bass () diets. After 90 days, the highest final weight, weight gain, specific growth rate, protein efficiency ratio, and the lowest feed conversion ratio were seen in fish treated with 10 g/kg ( < 0.05). Further, the measured growth hormone in the blood indicated that fish treated with 10 g/kg had a higher level than fish 0 and 20 g/kg. After the feeding trial, fish treated with cinnamon at varying levels had higher lipid content than fish before the feeding trial ( < 0.05). Lower spp. and Faecal Coliform counts were observed in fish treated with cinnamon than fish fed a cinnamon-free diet ( < 0.05). The hematocrit level was markedly ( < 0.05) increased in fish fed cinnamon at 10 g/kg compared to the control without significant differences with fish fed 15 and 20 g/kg. Hemoglobin was significantly increased in fish treated with cinnamon at 10, 15, and 20 g/kg compared to fish fed a cinnamon-free diet ( < 0.05). Red and white blood cells (RBCs and WBCs) were meaningfully ( < 0.05) increased in fish treated with cinnamon compared with the control. Markedly, fish treated with cinnamon had higher serum total lipids than the control with the highest value in fish treated with 15 g/kg ( < 0.05). The lysozyme activity was markedly higher in fish treated with 15 g cinnamon/kg than fish fed 0, 10, and 20 g/kg ( < 0.05). Moreover, phagocytic activity was significantly higher in fish treated with cinnamon at 10, and 15 g/kg than fish fed 0 and 20 g/kg ( < 0.05). In conclusion, dietary cinnamon is suggested at 10-15 g/kg for achieving the high production and wellbeing of European sea bass.

First Page

2128

Last Page

2128

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