Abstract

This thesis examines the relationship between elites and development and state building. It looks at how elite consolidation does or does not affect development and state building. It does this in the context of the cases of Egypt under Gamal Abdal Nasser and Korea under Park Chunghee. The thesis initially puts forward the argument that Korea's advantages from the colonial era set the basis for later development and state building, and paved the way for elite consolidation into the 1960s. However, the thesis ultimately finds that while Korea may have had some advantages from the colonial era that helped in development and state building, this was but one factor of the ability of elites to consolidate well. It ultimately argues that the ability of elites to effectively consolidate is connected to the efficiency of the bureaucracy and exogenous catastrophic circumstances, which are in turn connected to the success of development and state building processes.

Department

Political Science Department

Degree Name

MA in Political Science

Date of Award

6-1-2018

Online Submission Date

February 2018

First Advisor

Elnur, Ibrahim

Committee Member 1

Sika, Nadine

Committee Member 2

Duboc, Marie

Document Type

Thesis

Extent

110 p.

Rights

The author retains all rights with regard to copyright. The author certifies that written permission from the owner(s) of third-party copyrighted matter included in the thesis, dissertation, paper, or record of study has been obtained. The author further certifies that IRB approval has been obtained for this thesis, or that IRB approval is not necessary for this thesis. Insofar as this thesis, dissertation, paper, or record of study is an educational record as defined in the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 USC 1232g), the author has granted consent to disclosure of it to anyone who requests a copy.

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